ROTARACT CLUB OF KATHMANDU

"Fellowship Through Service"

Rotary International

 

Rotary International is an organization of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. It is a secular organization open to all persons regardless of race, color, creed, gender, or political preference. There are 33,976 clubs and over 1.22 million members worldwide.  The members of Rotary Clubs are known as RotariansThe stated purpose of the organization is to bring together business and professional leaders to provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace in the world. Members usually meet weekly for breakfast, lunch or dinner, which is a social event as well as an opportunity to organize work on their service goals.

Rotary's best-known motto is "Service above Self", and its secondary motto is "They profit most who serve best".

 

RI Founder

Paul P. Harris, a lawyer, was the founder of Rotary, the world's first and most international service club.

Born in Racine, Wisconsin, U.S.A. on 19 April 1868, Paul was the second of six children to George N. Harris and Cornelia Bryan Harris. At age 3 he moved to Wallingford, Vermont where he grew up in the care of his paternal grandparents. Married to Jean Thompson Harris (1881 - 1963), they had no children. He received an L.L.B. from the University of Iowa and received an honorary L.L.D. from the University of Vermont.

Paul Harris worked as a newspaper reporter, a business teacher, stock company actor, cowboy, and traveled extensively in the U.S.A. and Europe selling marble and granite. In 1896, he went to Chicago to practice law. One evening Paul visited the suburban home of a professional friend. After dinner, as they strolled through the neighborhood, Paul's friend introduced him to various tradesmen in their stores. It was here Paul conceived the idea of a club that could recapture some of the friendly spirit among businessmen in small communities.

On 23 February 1905, Paul Harris formed the first club with three other businessmen: Silvester Schiele (a coal merchant), Gustavus Loehr (a mining engineer) and Hiram Shorey (a merchant tailor). Paul Harris named the new club "Rotary" because members met in rotation at their various places of business. Club membership grew rapidly. Soon Paul became convinced that the Rotary club could be developed into an important service movement and strove to extend Rotary to other cities.

Paul was also prominent in other civic and professional work. He served as the first chairman of the board of the national Easter Seal Society of Crippled Children and Adults in the U.S.A. and of the International Society for Crippled Children. He was a member of the board of managers of the Chicago Bar Association and its representative at the International Congress of Law at the Hague, and a committee member of the American Bar Association. He received the Silver Buffalo Award from the Boy Scouts of America for distinguished service to youth, and was decorated by the governments of Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France and Peru.

Paul maintained his law office for most of his life. He spent much time traveling and was invited to speak to Rotarians at annual conventions, district and regional meetings, and other functions. When President emeritus Paul Harris passed away on 27 January 1947, his dream had grown from an informal meeting of four men to some 6,000 clubs. In the past five decades, the organization has grown to more than 32,000 clubs with 1.2 million members brought together through Paul Harris' vision of service and fellowship in more than 200 countries and geographical areas.text, images, and other content

Derivation of the rotary name

 

The name Rotary was chosen to reflect the custom, in the early days of the first Rotary Club in Chicago, of rotating the site of club meetings among the members' places of business. This rotation, an integral part of the founder's original concept, was designed to acquaint members with one another's vocations and to promote business, but the club's rapid growth soon made the custom impractical.

 

Rotary mottos

Early in its history, the members of the first Rotary club realized that fellowship and mutual self-interest were not enough to keep a group of busy professionals meeting each week. Undertaking efforts to improve the lives of others proved an even more powerful motivation. In 1907 the club adopted a practical community service project -- the installation of a public comfort station near the city hall in downtown Chicago. 

Three years after the organization of the Chicago club, a second club was formed in San Francisco, California, and three more clubs were founded the following year. By 1910, there were 16 clubs in the United States, and the first convention was held in Chicago where the clubs organized themselves to form the National Association of Rotary Clubs. At that convention, a member of the Chicago club proposed a motto for the new organization, recognizing its commitment to the idea of service: "He Profits Most Who Serves His Fellows Best." 

The following year, another early leader spoke of the importance of serving others and promoted the idea that a club should be organized on the principle of "Service, Not Self." The two sayings, modified to "He Profits Most Who Serves Best" and "Service Above Self," were quickly embraced by all Rotarians and were officially designated as Rotary mottoes at the 1950 convention in Detroit, Michigan. In 1989, the Rotary International Council on Legislation established "Service Above Self" as the organization's principal motto.  

Objectives of rotary

 

The objective of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:

  1. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  2. High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying by each Rotarian of his occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  3. The application of the ideal of service by every Rotarian to his personal, business, and community life;
  4. The advancement of international understanding, good will, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional men and women united in the ideal of service.  

 

Rotary's Wheel Emblem

 

A wheel has been the symbol of Rotary since our earliest days. The first design was made by Chicago Rotarian Montague Bear, an engraver who drew a simple wagon wheel, with a few lines to show dust and motion. The wheel was said to illustrate "Civilization and Movement." Most of the early clubs had some form of wagon wheel on their publications and letterheads. Finally, in 1922, it was decided that all Rotary clubs should adopt a single design as the exclusive emblem of Rotarians. Thus, in 1923, the present gear wheel, with 24 cogs and six spokes was adopted by the "Rotary International Association." A group of engineers advised that the geared wheel was mechanically unsound and would not work without a "keyway" in the center of the gear to attach it to a power shaft. So, in 1923 the keyway was added and the design which we now know was formally adopted as the official Rotary International emblem.

Rotary Club of Kathmandu

 Rotary Club of Kathmandu was the first Rotary Club in Nepal. Some 50 years after the formation of the Rotary club (to be specific the second San Francisco club), four Nepalese professionals and business persons were conferring to start Rotary movement by forming a Rotary Club in Nepal (Kathmandu). Rotary Club of Dharbanga (Dharbanga ? 3250) came forward for sponsorship. The four pioneering individuals were Dr. J.N. Giri, General Kiran Shamsher JB Rana, Gopal Raj Rajbhandari and Dr. Dev Rath. In the gracious presence of the then King Late Mahendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev, The Rotary Club of Kathmandu was organized on November 20, 1958 and received the membership of RI on  April 13, 1959.

The current president of Rotary Club of Kathmandu is Rtn. Dan Bahadur Chand.  

It was a great day for Rotary and a great day for Nepal.

Since the formation of the Rotary Club of Kathmandu (The first Rotary Club in Nepal) on 13 April, 1959, all Rotary Clubs in Nepal had been a part of various districts in India.

For details of all previous districting, please refer to the history of District 3291.

Almost exactly 50 years after Kathmandu was chartered, Nepal was granted its own district number 3292 which became effective on 1 July 2008.

In the 2008 year therefore, 50 year celebrations occurred for the golden anniversary of RC Kathmandu, the golden anniversary of Rotary's entry into Nepal and simultaneously, for the eventual allocatin of a district solely to cater for the many clubs in Nepal.

At the time of this entry, there were 70 Rotary Clubs throughout Nepal with total membership of over 2,000.

The first District Governor was Rtn Dr. Tika Man Vaidya, the Charter President of Rotary Club of Patan West.

Almost exactly 50 years after Kathmandu was chartered, Nepal was granted its own district number 3292 which became effective on 1 July 2008.

In the 2008 year therefore, 50 year celebrations occurred for the golden anniversary of RC Kathmandu, the golden anniversary of Rotary's entry into Nepal and simultaneously, for the eventual allocatin of a district solely to cater for the many clubs in Nepal.

At the time of this entry, there were 70 Rotary Clubs throughout Nepal with total membership of over 2,000.

The first District Governor was Rtn Dr. Tika Man Vaidya, the Charter President of Rotary Club of Patan West.

The 2009-2010 District Governor was Rtn. Ratna Man Sakya of RC Kathmandu. 

 
The 2009-2010 District Governor was Rtn. Ratna Man Sakya of RC Kathmandu.
 
Since the formation of the Rotary Club of Kathmandu (The first Rotary Club in Nepal) on 13 April, 1959, all Rotary Clubs in Nepal had been a part of various districts in India.
For details of all previous districting, please refer to the history of District 3291.
 
Almost exactly 50 years after Kathmandu was chartered, Nepal was granted its own district number 3292 which became effective on 1 July 2008.
 
In the 2008 year therefore, 50 year celebrations occurred for the golden anniversary of RC Kathmandu, the golden anniversary of Rotary's entry into Nepal and simultaneously, for the eventual allocatin of a district solely to cater for the many clubs in Nepal.
 
At the time of this entry, there were 70 Rotary Clubs throughout Nepal with total membership of over 2,000.
 
The first District Governor was Rtn Dr. Tika Man Vaidya, the Charter President of Rotary Club of Patan West.
 
The 2009-2010 District Governor was Rtn. Ratna Man Sakya of RC Kathmandu.

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Important Links

     

               www.rotary.org/

              www.rotaract.org/

            www.nepalrotary.org/

           www.rotaractnepal.org/

           www.rckathmandu.org/

         www.solidaritynepal.org/

www.rajendragautam.webnode.com/

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